On Death

to die:

  1. see: to live.
  2. a process that re­sults in death. Also, dy­ing.
  3. of­ten mis­used in place of dead. Example: He died. Instead of He is dead. This is like say­ing He lived. It is ob­vi­ous and there­fore need­less. He is alive is much bet­ter. see al­so: When You Die, You’re Dead. This us­age is sim­i­lar to the use of bald­ing. A thing is ei­ther bald or not bald. The process of bald­ing takes so long as to be mean­ing­less.[NB]

    death:

    1. The lim­i­nal state be­tween dy­ing and dead.
    2. The last in­stant of life. [Assuming dead is not a state of be­ing.]
    3. The first in­stant of be­ing dead. [Assuming dead is a state of be­ing.]

      dead:

      1. No longer alive.
      2. An ob­jec­tive state [on­ly to those alive] in ref­er­ence to the body of some­one who who has fin­ished dy­ing and ex­pe­ri­enced death.
      3. A sub­jec­tive state [on­ly to those alive] in ref­er­ence to the sentience/​consciousness/​soul of some­one who has fin­ished dy­ing and ex­pe­ri­enced death.
      4. An ob­jec­tive state [on­ly to those dead] in ref­er­ence to their body. [Assuming dead is a state of be­ing].
      5. A sub­jec­tive state [on­ly to those dead] in ref­er­ence to the sentience/​consciousness/​soul. [Assuming dead is a state of be­ing].
      6. A mean­ing­less word.
      7. A word with too many mean­ings.