Renshai Chronicles

Monday, 29 July 2002

af­ter a sum­mer filled with read­ing works con­sid­ered to be fine pieces of lit­er­a­ture, my re­turn to the books i have en­joyed the most, fan­tasy nov­els, is bit­ter­sweet. i rel­ish the sto­ries for their en­ter­tain­ment value, but now they are start­ing to seem a little…juvenile. per­haps this is just due to the books i am read­ing cur­rently, The Renshai Chronicles, by Mickey Zucker Reichert. i have not read any­thing by this au­thor be­fore so per­haps it is just the li­cense she takes with Norse mythol­ogy in com­bi­na­tion with her vaguely Dungeons and Dragons sto­ry­li­nes (i’ve never en­joyed that type of fan­tasy). The char­ac­ters are all teenagers and be­have ex­actly like teens in re­gard to af­fairs of the heart, but when it comes to mak­ing emo­tional de­ci­sions they are ra­tio­nal as a sophist. it is un­nerv­ing, es­pe­cially since they are all sa­vants and ex­cel in their re­spec­tive ‘job class’ to bor­row a phrase from D&D, of­ten ri­val­ing those with decades or cen­turies more ex­pe­ri­ence. it would be a good story if it weren’t so ob­vi­ously con­trived. I do not be­lieve this re­vul­sion will trans­fer to works of gen­uine cre­ative fan­tasy that of­fers philo­soph­i­cal and moral dilem­mas, (LotR, The Recluce Series) or those which of­fer more than just swords and sor­cery (The Wheel of Time, any­thing by Patricia McKillip). I am just tired of cook­iecut­ter fan­tasy trilo­gies. i need some­thing new.